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Maar-keyen bonarA Poem about the six Seasons

Maar-keyen bonar


Birak

It starts with a thirst that feels unquenchable. The drought
that sits at the back of our throats waiting for us to dissolve.
The season of fire eats away at us, slowly working its way
from our chaffed lips, sweltering hearts, into our parched souls.


Bunuru

The burning intensifies, turning to a raging simmer. The relentless,
bittersweet hum of summer shows no reprieve. Heat soars,
thirst climbs, and our soul continues searching well into the scorching nights.
But white flowers on gum trees signal peace from windows.


Djeran

Slowly, the breezes sally - tormenting the golden hush of endless summer
and the weather is forced to turn, sighing windily. Sweat begins to cool off
under the canopy of leaves that fall into a soft blanket from trees and
luscious flowers of summer flame unfurl - glowing ruby red.


Mukuru

The rain answers our prayers arriving vibrant and full of vigour.
Storming and seizing, smoothing over the contours of our arid
landscape. Waterholes fill up, jewel-like in scant country. And, cool
turns to a cold, the kind that tickles our bones with its fingers.


Djilba

Now, the weather turns again on its dancing feet. It is uncertain,
transitional, as it gently sways between cold and warm. A little bout of
storm, some wind and then clear balmy days that heal. We eat sweet plum
and bask in blooming yellow wattle, enjoying the indecision.


Kambarang

Days stretch, lengthening into tepid solemn nights. The rain has
all but gone, leaving behind some reminders of its season. Now as native
Christmas trees begin to blossom with vibrant flowers, we wait
for the cycle of sun and moon to take us back full circle to another beginning.


About
the poet

SoulReserve

Written by ardent writer and wistful poet SoulReserve, Derbal Nara explores the transitions between the six Nyungar seasons.

SoulReserve says the six seasons “weave and flow from one to the other, signalling different occurrences - the flowering of plants, the aestivation of reptiles, the emergence of animals, the moulting of swans”. She says she has tried to capture the essence of the changing seasons in her poem that is an “ode to the people living in harmony with the land for countless millennia”.

SoulReserve has written over 1000 pieces of contemporary poetry which explore love and its tumultuousness, the fantasy and zest in nature, and allegories that provoke thought and evoke tender feelings.
If you want to get in touch with SoulReserve, you can reach her at soulreserve@yahoo.com or on Instagram @soulreserve.

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